Tag Archives: Food & Wine Pairing

Cioppino, A Delightful Seafood Stew

Cioppino, A Delightful Seafood Stew
Cioppino, A Delightful Seafood Stew

 

Cioppino, A Delightful Seafood Stew
Cioppino, A Delightful Seafood Stew

 

Cioppino, A delightful Seafood Stew

 

Cioppino, A Delighful Seafood Stew

Cioppino is a rich and delightful seafood stew that originated in San Francisco. It’s usually made with the catch of the day, and the addition of Dungeness crabs is very popular in the Bay area.  This Italian-American dish consists of an array of seafood, simmered in a tomato and wine broth. It’s somewhat similar to some regional Italian seafood dishes. This stew is usually served with a piece of toasted bread to sop up all the deliciousness of the broth. I consider this recipe for special occasions as it is on the pricey side. Put on your apron and follow me in the kitchen for my spin on this delectable meal.

Serves: 6-8 Difficulty level: Easy-medium
Time from prepping to finish 30-45 minutes at the most.


Ingredients:

  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil + more to drizzle
  • 2 medium shallots, chopped
  • 3 slices (rings) of fresh fennel
  • 6 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. tomato paste
  • ½ cup of dry white wine
  • 2 cups seafood stock
  • 1 cup chopped tomatoes
  • ¼ tsp. Oregano
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • Pinch of crushed red pepper
  • Pinch of fennel seeds, optional
  • 18 little neck or middle neck clams
  • ½ lb. of sea scallops
  • ½ lb. large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 lb. of mussels
  • ¾ lb. cod-fish, cut up in medium size pieces
  • Flat leave parsley for garnish
  • 1 loaf of Italian bread or French baguette, cut-open, toasted
  • olive oil or butter for the bread.

    Preparation:
    1
    ) In a medium-sized pot, on medium-high heat, heat olive oil. Sauté shallots and fennel rings for 2 minutes. Stir occasionally. Add garlic, sauté 1-2 minutes. Add tomato paste, cook for 1 minute. Stir. Deglaze with wine, cook 1 minute.
    2) Add seafood stock, chopped tomatoes, oregano, salt, crushed pepper and fennel seeds. Bring to a boil, add the clams, scallops, shrimp, mussels, and place the fish on top. Cover, lower the flame to low, and simmer for 5-6 minutes, baste the fish with the broth once or twice. Cover and continue cooking for an additional 5-6 minutes, or until the clams and mussels are open.
    3) 5 minutes prior to completion, drizzle some oil or spread some butter on the bread. Broil for about 2-3 minutes. Remove.
    4) Place the seafood stew in a bowl, with a piece of bread to dunk, and drizzle with olive oil. Garnish with fresh parsley.
    Wine pairing suggestions: Explore the world of Italian white wines like a delicious Vermentino, a lovely Verdicchio, or a minerally dry Pinot Grigio from Northern Italy.

    Happy Cooking from My Kitchen to Yours!

    Gina Martino Zarcadoolas, Foodiewinelover
    My Food, Wine & Travel Lifestyles
    World renowned – WSET (Wine, Spirit, Education, Trust)
    Level-2 Certified Wine Connoisseur.
    Culinary Aficionado & Lover of Global Cuisines & Travels

    Photos by Gina Martino Zarcadoolas for Foodiewinelover
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Delicious Fresh Snapper Ceviche

Fresh Snapper for Ceviche
Fresh Snapper for Ceviche
Freshly-caught snapper
Freshly-caught snapper
Ceviche by Foodiewinelover
Ceviche by Foodiewinelover

My son PJ loves the ocean and is passionate about all sea creatures. He enjoys fishing, and once in a while, he brings home a nice catch. He recently caught a nice mutton snapper and fileted it. The first thing that came to his mind was a ceviche. This dish originated in Peru and Ecuador, in South America. It is often spelled seviche or cebiche depending on the region. Ceviche consists of raw fish that’s marinated and cooked in an acidic juice instead of heat.  Lime is usually the preferred method to prepare it. The Peruvian use Aji Amarillo, an indigenous chili pepper to give it some kick. It is widely used in their traditional dishes. It’s hard to find but you can substitute for jalapeño peppers. Ceviche has quickly become a trendy and popular dish in the US.  Famous and aspiring chefs are putting their own spin on it to give it a modern touch.  Let’s get busy in the kitchen!

Level of difficulty: Easy  – Serves: 3-4 as an appetizer

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium-sized mutton snapper, filleted, and diced
  • 3 lime, juiced
  • 1 handful  of cilantro, chopped
  • Sea salt to taste
  • Aji Amarillo, or jalapeño, optional
  • Avocado pieces as an accompaniment

    Preparation:
    Combine the fish, lime juice, cilantro, salt and hot pepper.  Marinate in the refrigerator for at least 3-4 hours. The fish will have an opaque color on the outside. This would be a sign that it’s done and ready to be savored. Serve the Ceviche with some avocados.

    Wine pairing suggestions: 
    A dry Riesling from Germany or Torrontés, a crisp white wine with floral notes from Argentina.  When in doubt, pair it with a fruity Prosecco or a Brut bubbly of your choice. The choice is  yours, but stay away from a wine that has too much acid as it will clash with the lime juice. A clerk at your local wine store is usually trained to help you in selecting the perfect wine to pair with your food.Happy Marinating!Gina – Foodiewinelover
    My Food, Wine & Travel Lifestyles

    Photos taken by Gina Martino Zarcadoolas for Foodiewinelover (except for the peppers) Proper credit is given.
    Recipe by Foodiewinelover

Aji Amarillo, chili pepper
Aji Amarillo, chili pepper (stock photo, image source provided)

 

Bucatini all’Amatriciana, an Italian Classic Pasta Dish

Pancetta
Pancetta

Pancetta

Bucatini
Bucatini
Bucatini
Bucatini

Bucatini all’Amatriciana is a classic, and traditional Italian dish that originated in the Lazio region of Italy. Ideally, guanciale is used, but it’s not a common ingredient to find in the United States. The next best thing I recommend, is using pancetta, or bacon. This sauce is usually paired with a pasta shape called bucatini. It’s like a thick spaghetti, but hollow on the inside. It soaks up the sauce perfectly. This recipe is easy, mouth-watering,  and can be done in very little time, on a weeknight.

Ingredients:

2 tbsp. Olive oil
3/4 lb. pancetta, cubed
1 small onion, diced
4 garlic cloves, sliced
1 chopped Tomatoes, Pomi brand * 26 ounces
14 ounces of San Marzano tomatoes (1/2 of 28-ounce can) *
Salt to taste, for sauce and pasta water
Freshly ground black pepper
Pinch of red pepper flakes
Pinch of sugar, optional
Flat leave parsley, 1/2 tsp. chopped
1 lb. bucatini, pasta
Pecorino Romano cheese, grated

Serves: 4-6 Level of difficulty: Easy

Preparation:

1) Bring a pot of water to a boil for the pasta.  Add salt.

2) in the meanwhile, in a medium-sized saucepan , over medium heat, heat olive oil, pan fry the pancetta, 5 -8 minutes until it renders some fat, remove, set aside.

3) In the same pan, add onions, garlic, sauté  for couple of minutes. Add tomatoes, salt, pepper, pepper flakes, sugar, parsley, cooked pancetta.

4) Bring to a boil, and simmer on medium low for about 30 minutes or so.  Stir occasionally.

5) While sauce is simmering, drop pasta in the boiling water, cook according to package directions.  I like it al dente, which means to the bite.

6) Drain the pasta, be sure to drizzle some oil, and a little sauce to avoid clumping. Give it a good stir. Set aside. Taste sauce, adjust the seasoning, if necessary.  Once you taste the pancetta and the seasoning in the sauce,  it’s time, to drop the pasta in the sauce.  Turn the stove off, mix well to coat every strand of pasta.  Place in bowls, sprinkle with cheese.

Buon Appetito!

Tips: You can use any brand tomatoes of your choice, and they don’t have to be San Marzano. Sugar is optional, and not necessary. I use it at times to get the right balance of acidity.

Wine pairing: My friend, and fellow sommelier, Certified Italian Wine Specialist, Angela Santarelli, recommends a wine with acidity to balance the fat. Her ideal pairing with this dish would be a Sangiovese based wine. Her second go to for red, a Montepulciano d’Abruzzo. She also suggests exploring some wines further South, in the Campagna region.

You can follow her on Twitter: —>  Constantwining

I hope I have inspired you with another delightful Italian pasta dish.

Happy Cooking from My Kitchen to Yours!

Gina, Foodiewinelover
My Food, Wine, & Travel Lifestyles

Bucatini all'Amatriciana
Bucatini all’Amatriciana

Recipe by: Foodiewinelover
Images by:  Foodiewinelover
Wine pairing suggestions by:  Angela Santarelli over at Constantwining

 

 

 

Heavenly Cheeses, Food & Wine Pairings

Hello everyone! This is probably my longest blog post to date, because it is my favorite, and most passionate subject,  Food & Wine. This explains my blog name, Foodiewinelover.  I have put together a compilation of my dining and wining experience on Heavenly Cheeses, Food & Wine Pairings.  Please do not forget to read the descriptions on all my photos.  Cheeses are among my favorite food groups, and when I’m entertaining, I love pairing them with delicious wines. There is an abundance of cheeses, and wines from all corners of the world, but unfortunately, there aren’t enough time to mention all of them.   Ideally, I love pairing cheese with the wine from the same region, or country, especially when I’m having a themed party. However,  there are no set rules about it, and, you can mix and match food and wines from different countries, as you please. There are hard, soft, and semi-soft cheeses. One of my favorite cheeses is Parmigiano-Reggiano, an Italian Parmesan cheese, aged 36 months, that I brought back with me from Italy. To me it’s considered the king of Italian cheeses, and has a lovely nuttiness to it.  According to Giada de Laurentiis, a famous Italian Chef, it’s best if you pick it with a knife, to get into all the nook and crannies, for optimal flavors.  In general, white wine is ideal to pair with cheeses because of their higher acidity content, and boost up the layers of flavors of cheeses. However, If you are not a big fan of whites, don’t fret, red wines  also make a nice pairing. Ultimately, you decide what works well with your palate. I am also sharing with you some delectable food that goes with some interesting wines.  Here are a few suggestions to impress your friends at your next gathering.

Guidalberto paired with Parmigiano Reggiano
Sexy, seductive, full-bodied, Super Tuscan, Italian wine, blend of Cabernet and Merlot – 2012 Tenuta SanGuido – Guidalberto . The color is a scintillating cherry-red. At first, floral aromas and dark cherries on the nose, then, when I swirl it, the earthiness comes out. I smell barnyard and chocolate. I swoosh it in my mouth, I get hints of tobacco, chocolate, leather, and all the flavor profile I desire in a wine. The finish is succulent and lingering. This wine pairs heavenly with Parmigiano Reggiano.
Cheese and wine pairing
Great cheese and wine pairings: Pulenta Cab from Argentina, Robert Mondavi, Emblem California Cab, & a platter of barrel aged Feta, Ginger and Mango Stilton, Pecorino Romano cheese.
Epoisse
Wine & Cheese for Dinner! Époisses, the stinkiest cheese ever. Lol! Prima Donna, a blend of Parmigiano Reggiano and Gouda, paired with La Crema, Pinot Noir. If you prefer white, you can pair with an Albarino, or a nice Chablis, (Chardonnay from Burgundy)
Manchego and Crianza
Manchego cheese paired magically with Miguel Torres Celeste Crianza, from the Ribera del Duero region of Spain. A beautiful pairing of cheese and wine from the same country.
Malbecandcheesepairing
Girls Night Out! Malbec paired with scrumptious Comte, Idiazabal and Ossau Iraty cheeses. 🍷🍷🍷
MerlotandHumboldtFog
Merlot and Humboldt Fog cheese….Pinot Noir would have been a nice choice as well
BrunellowithDeliceDeBourgogne
Le Delice De Bourgogne cheese paired with a fantastic Brunello.  If you are into white wines, another suggestion for this cheese is an oaky Chardonnay 

 

Foodiewinelover Stonecrabs
Stonecrabs paired with Champagne for my birthday in 2014

 

Foodiewinelover Bubblies
When in doubt, bubblies go with almost everything

 

Espinacas y Garbanzos
Spinach and Garbanzos, paired with a lovely white Rioja
Bai Gorri Rioja
Bai Gorri Rioja, An elegant white wine, well-balanced with intense flavors of oak, paired heavenly with an assortment of Spanish dishes, Shrimp with Garlic, Spinach with Garbanzo beans, Paella, and Manchego cheese. This was at our Spanish-themed wine party.

 

Lamb Loin Chops
Lamb Loin Chops pair beautifully with Chateau-Neuf-du-Pape or a nice red Bordeaux

 

Paella
Paella pairs deliciously with a nice Rose’
Rose' pairs nicely with a Paella
Rose’

 

Beets and Goat Cheese
Beets and Goat Cheese pair lusciously with a crisp Sauvignon Blanc
Gouda and Epoisses cheeses paired with Merlot
Gouda and Epoisses cheeses, caramelized walnuts and fig spread, paired exquisitely with Chateau Lyonnat, a Merlot from the Bordeaux region. Delicieux!
Veal Bolognese
Veal Bolognese over Pappardelle, paired nicely with a Rosso di Montalcino
Porterhouse for two paired with a Super Tuscan
Aged Porterhouse for two paired scrumptiously with a Super Tuscan

If you are a salmon lover, pick a lush Pinot Noir from Oregon, or one from the Russian River Valley, Sonoma county, California.  They both would make great choices. For any white fish, select a crisp white wine, if you want to get fancy, try a delightful Sancerre, (Sauvignon Blanc) from the Loire Valley.  If you are on a budget, stick to a nice chilled chardonnay.  Spicy food pair well with an off-dry Riesling, Viognier or Gewurztraminer. Pungent cheeses such as Gorgonzola, or Blue Cheese stand up to dessert wines, port or cognac. Sauternes, a French dessert wine, with notes of apricots,  is a nice complement to Roquefort cheese and Foie Gras. Let’s not forget about Ricotta cheese which is used in savory dishes such as stuffed shells. They make a great pairing with a nice Chianti, Rosso di Montalcino, or any medium-bodied Italian reds.  Ricotta cheese is also used as a scrumptious filling in cannolis, and goes well with a Moscato d’Asti, a lovely dessert wine from the Piedmont region of Italy.  If you are looking for a match made in heaven,  my friend, fellow-sommelier, Certified Italian Wine Specialist, Angela, from Constant Wining suggests pairing a cantuccini, an Italian biscotti, with Vin Santo. We had it at one of our Italian-themed wine party, and it was a major hit, and a fantastic way to end a superb evening with fun friends. Mascarpone, is an italian sweet cheese, and one of the main ingredients in the delectable dessert Tiramisu. It can be paired with either the Vin Santo, or the Moscato d’Asti.

I am posting links to some of the cheeses that I feature in this blogpost,  so you can learn more about their process, origin, and history.

Parmigiano Reggiano and Pecorino Romano, two Italian giants, are excellent grating cheeses for pasta dishes.  Gorgonzola,  Blue Stilton, Roquefort,  are considered some of the world’s most famous Bleu Cheeses. Feta Cheese is one of the most famous Greek cheeses. Humboldt Fog, is a goat milk and pungent in flavors. Epoisses is a pungent cows-milk cheese.  Delice de Bourgogne, is a French cow’s milk cheese. Manchego is a sheep’s milk from Spain. Comté is a cow’s milk from France. Ossau Iraty is a sheep’s cheese from France.  Idiazabal is a sheep’s milk from Spain.

I hope you have enjoyed some of my food and wine suggestions, and in closing, I would love to share some fun quotes with you.

“All four elements were happening in equal measure – the cuisine, the wine, the service, and the overall ambience. It taught me that dining could happen at a spiritual level.” Charlie Trotter

“Wine to me is passion. It’s family and friends. It’s warmth of heart and generosity of spirit. Wine is art. It’s culture. It’s the essence of civilization and the art of living.” Robert Mondavi

Most importantly, I enjoy sharing food & wine with close friends, and family. It elevates the experience to another level.

Disclosure: All the pictures in this blog post are my own, and were taken either with my iPhone or my Canon Rebel T3 camera.  They were shot at various restaurants, a friend’s house, and my home.

Cheers to good health and a well-lived life!

Gina, aka, FoodieWineLover